Police

So, Monday, I had horrible, horrible pain in my kidney most of the day starting about, oh, 2 am. By evening, I was feeling a bit better, and also I was exhausted. So I ended up climbing into bed with Genna (who was sooo clingy) and watching some TV. I was watching Police Women of Maricopa County (yes, OK, I DVR it for those nights when I can’t sleep).

And I like the show (as I liked Police Women of Broward County last season, which I only caught on a multi-hour marathon one day while doing some work in the basement). But this episode had a scene with one of the police women (and her team) going after a guy who had a warrant. They knocked on the door, and a woman answered, and they asked her if the guy they were looking for was home, she said no, they asked if they could come in and look around, and she said no, not if they didn’t have a warrant to enter her home.

Pause for a moment. She WAS lying. The guy was home, and she knew he was home. One of the policemen was watching through a back window as she woke him up and told him to go hide. That is beside the point.

They made a big deal out of if she didn’t have anything to hide, she would let them in. Then later, after they’d arrested both of them and were doing a quick interview with the police woman, she went on and on about how you do whatever the police ask you, and if they want to look around your home, you should let them, if you’re not doing anything wrong, you have nothing to be afraid of. “We’re the police, what do you have to be afraid of?” She went on to imply that if you don’t do whatever the police ask, you’ll be arrested.

Well, pardon me, but the LAW is that no citizen has to let the police into their home without a warrant, which may be obtained if the police have a good reason to be in your home. The law does not say that citizens must allow the police in any time they ask. It’s in the Constitution. You know, that antiquated document that nobody ever reads any more?

“The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

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